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Deviance Removal and Global Self-Esteem: Evidence from the Harlem Longitudinal Study of Urban Black Youth

Citation

Jackson, Pamela Braboy & Henderson, Kathryn A. (2006). Deviance Removal and Global Self-Esteem: Evidence from the Harlem Longitudinal Study of Urban Black Youth. Research in Human Development, 3(4), 229-249.

Abstract

In this study, we contribute to extant research that has addressed the impact of institutions on individuals by examining the consequences of deviance removal (or displacement/reemplacement) on changes in global self-esteem across the life course. We assessed the effects of 3 disruptive experiences: incarceration, hospitalization, and drug treatment. We took the data employed in this study from the Harlem Longitudinal Study of Urban Black Youth (Brunswick, 1976), a 5-wave study of African Americans. We found that removal experiences are associated with declines in self-esteem but primarily early in the life course and when the experience is proximate in time. This suggests that the timing of deviance removal plays an important role in the ability to resist the negative consequences of some forms of displacement.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15427617rhd0304_4

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2006

Journal Title

Research in Human Development

Author(s)

Jackson, Pamela Braboy
Henderson, Kathryn A.