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The Determinants of Infant and Child Mortality in Tanzania

Citation

Mturi, Akim J. & Curtis, Siân L. (1995). The Determinants of Infant and Child Mortality in Tanzania. Health Policy and Planning, 10(4), 384-94.

Abstract

This paper investigates the determinants of infant and child mortality in Tanzania using the 1991/92 Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey. A hazards model is used to assess the relative effect of the variables hypothesized to influence under-five mortality. Short birth intervals, teenage pregnancies and previous child deaths are associated with increased risk of death. The Government of the United Republic of Tanzania should therefore maintain its commitment to encouraging women to space their births at least two years apart and delay childbearing beyond the teenage years. Further, this study shows that there is a remarkable lack of infant and child mortality differentials by socioeconomic subgroups of the population, which may reflect post-independence health policy and development strategies. Whilst lack of socioeconomic differentials can be considered an achievement of government policies, mortality remains high so there is still a long way to go before Tanzania achieves its stated goal of ‘Health for All’.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/heapol/10.4.384

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Health Policy and Planning

Author(s)

Mturi, Akim J.
Curtis, Siân L.

Year Published

1995

Volume Number

10

Issue Number

4

Pages

384-94

Reference ID

4396