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A Case-Control Study of Tobacco Use and Other Non-Occupational Risk Factors for Lymphoma Subtypes Defined by t(14; 18) Translocations and bcl-2 Expression

Citation

Chang, Cindy M.; Schroeder, Jane C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Dunphy, Cherie H.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Baric, Ralph S.; Conway, Kathleen; Cerhan, James R.; Lynch, Charles F.; & Rothman, Nathaniel, et al. (2010). A Case-Control Study of Tobacco Use and Other Non-Occupational Risk Factors for Lymphoma Subtypes Defined by t(14; 18) Translocations and bcl-2 Expression. Cancer Causes & Control, 21(7), 1147-1154. PMCID: PMC3052629

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We re-evaluated reported associations between tobacco use and other factors and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) t(14; 18)-subtypes based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays believed to be more sensitive than polymerase chain reaction (PCR), previously used for detecting t(14; 18).
METHODS: Commercial FISH assays and bcl-2 immunostaining were performed on paraffin sections to determine t(14; 18) and bcl-2 case-subtypes. Polytomous logistic regression models estimated associations between NHL case-subtypes (versus 1,245 population-based controls) and tobacco use as well as other factors.
RESULTS: Adjusting for age, state, and proxy status, t(14; 18)-negative NHL was associated with any tobacco use (vs. no tobacco use, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.5), including current smoking (vs. no cigarette use, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.1-3.2). Tobacco exposures were not clearly associated with t(14; 18)-positive NHL or bcl-2 case-subtypes. Hair-dye use and family history of a hemolymphatic cancer were associated with t(14; 18)-negative NHL, but the number of exposed cases was small.
CONCLUSIONS: The association between t(14; 18)-negative NHL and cigarette smoking was unexpected given previous evidence of associations between smoking and follicular lymphoma (which is largely t(14; 18)-positive). Future studies characterizing additional molecular characteristics of t(14; 18)-negative NHL may help determine whether the association with smoking may have been causal versus an artifact of chance or bias.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9531-8

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2010

Journal Title

Cancer Causes & Control

Author(s)

Chang, Cindy M.
Schroeder, Jane C.
Olshan, Andrew F.
Dunphy, Cherie H.
Huang, Wen-Yi
Baric, Ralph S.
Conway, Kathleen
Cerhan, James R.
Lynch, Charles F.
Rothman, Nathaniel
Cantor, Kenneth P.
Blair, Aaron

PMCID

PMC3052629