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Invited Commentary: Decomposing with a Lot of Supposing

Citation

Kaufman, Jay S. (2010). Invited Commentary: Decomposing with a Lot of Supposing. American Journal of Epidemiology, 172(12), 1349-1351. PMCID: PMC3139971

Abstract

In this issue of the Journal, VanderWeele and Vansteelandt (Am J Epidemiol. 2010;172(12):1339–1348) provide simple formulae for estimation of direct and indirect effects using standard logistic regression when the exposure and outcome are binary, the mediator is continuous, and the odds ratio is the chosen effect measure. They also provide concisely stated lists of assumptions necessary for estimation of these effects, including various conditional independencies and homogeneity of exposure and mediator effects over covariate strata. They further suggest that this will allow effect decomposition in case-control studies if the sampling fractions and population outcome prevalence are known with certainty. In this invited commentary, the author argues that, in a well-designed case-control study in which the sampling fraction is known, it should not be necessary to rely on the odds ratio. The odds ratio has well-known deficiencies as a causal parameter, and its use severely complicates evaluation of confounding and effect homogeneity. Although VanderWeele and Vansteelandt propose that a rare disease assumption is not necessary for estimation of controlled direct effects using their approach, collapsibility concerns suggest otherwise when the goal is causal inference rather than merely measuring association. Moreover, their clear statement of assumptions necessary for the estimation of natural/pure effects suggests that these quantities will rarely be viable estimands in observational epidemiology.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwq329

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2010

Journal Title

American Journal of Epidemiology

Author(s)

Kaufman, Jay S.

PMCID

PMC3139971