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Neighborhood Immigration and Native Out-Migration

Citation

Crowder, Kyle D.; Hall, Matthew; & Tolnay, Stewart E. (2011). Neighborhood Immigration and Native Out-Migration. American Sociological Review, 76(1), 25-47. PMCID: PMC3124827

Abstract

This study combines data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics with data from four censuses to examine the effects of foreign-born populations in the immediate and surrounding neighborhoods of residence on native-born black and white householders’ residential mobility decisions. We find that the likelihood of out-mobility for native householders is significantly and positively associated with the relative size of, and increases in, the immigrant population in a neighborhood. Consistent with theoretical arguments related to the distance dependence of mobility, large concentrations of immigrants in surrounding areas reduce native out-mobility, presumably by reducing the attractiveness of the most likely mobility destinations. A sizable share of local immigration effects can be explained by the mobility-related characteristics of native-born individuals living in immigrant-populated areas, but the racial composition of a neighborhood (for native whites) and local housing-market conditions (for native blacks) are also important mediating factors. We discuss the implications of these patterns for processes of neighborhood change and broader patterns of residential segregation.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122410396197

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2011

Journal Title

American Sociological Review

Author(s)

Crowder, Kyle D.
Hall, Matthew
Tolnay, Stewart E.

PMCID

PMC3124827