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Urban-Rural Differences in Growth and Diarrhoeal Morbidity of Filipino Infants

Citation

Adair, Linda S.; VanDerslice, James; & Zohoori, Namvar (1993). Urban-Rural Differences in Growth and Diarrhoeal Morbidity of Filipino Infants. In Schell, Lawrence M.; Smith, Malcolm T.; & Bilsborough, Alan (Eds.), Urban Ecology and Health in the Third World (pp. 75-98). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Abstract

Numerous reports that present data on child growth and health outcomes around the world highlight urban-rural differences. Many of the classic growth studies reported in Tanner & Eveleth (1976) show that, in general, children in urban areas tend to be healthier, taller and heavier than children in surrounding rural areas. Similarly, data from the FAO's 1985 Fifth World Survey (presented in Fig. 1 of Keller, 1988) show consistent urban-rural differences in the prevalence of stunting and wasting among 0–5 year old children (see Fig. 6.1). The better health status of urban children is often attributed to a regular supply of goods, health and sanitation services, education, and medical facilities, associated with the urban environment.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511600494.006

Reference Type

Book Chapter

Book Title

Urban Ecology and Health in the Third World

Author(s)

Adair, Linda S.
VanDerslice, James
Zohoori, Namvar

Editor(s)

Schell, Lawrence M.
Smith, Malcolm T.
Bilsborough, Alan

Year Published

1993

Pages

75-98

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

City of Publication

Cambridge, England

Reference ID

5