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Umbilical Cord Serum Interleukin-6, C-Reactive Protein, and Myeloperoxidase Concentrations at Birth and Association with Neonatal Morbidities and Long-Term Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

Citation

Sorokin, Yoram; Romero, Roberto; Mele, Lisa; Iams, Jay D.; Peaceman, Alan M.; Leveno, Kenneth J.; Harper, Margaret A.; Caritis, Steve N.; Mercer, Brian M.; & Thorp, John M., Jr., et al. (2014). Umbilical Cord Serum Interleukin-6, C-Reactive Protein, and Myeloperoxidase Concentrations at Birth and Association with Neonatal Morbidities and Long-Term Neurodevelopmental Outcomes. American Journal of Perinatology, 31(8), 717-726. PMCID: PMC4359689

Abstract

Objective: The aim of the study is to determine if umbilical cord serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and myeloperoxidase (MPO), in pregnancies at risk for preterm birth (PTB), are associated with neonatal morbidities and/or altered neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children.
Study Design: Umbilical cord serum samples were collected at birth from 400 newborns delivered within a multicenter randomized controlled trial of repeated versus single course of antenatal corticosteroids (ACs), in women at increased risk for PTB. Newborns were followed through discharge and were evaluated between 36 and 42 months corrected age with neurological examination and Bayley Scales of Infant Development. Umbilical cord serum concentrations of IL-6, CRP, and MPO were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Multivariate logistic regression analyses explored the relationship between umbilical cord serum IL-6, CRP, and MPO levels, adverse newborn outcomes, and PTB < 32 weeks of gestational age (GA).
Results: Univariate analysis revealed that umbilical cord IL-6 above the 75th percentile was associated with increased respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and chronic lung disease (CLD), but not with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), or neonatal sepsis; however, this association was not significant after adjusting for GA at delivery and treatment group. No significant associations between CRP or MPO and RDS, CLD, NEC, sepsis, or IVH were evident. Regression analysis revealed that CRP above the 75th percentile was associated with a decreased risk of CLD (odds ratio, 0.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.41). No associations between umbilical cord IL-6, CRP, or MPO and MDI < 70 or PDI < 70 were evident. Umbilical cord serum concentrations of IL-6, CRP, and MPO, above the 75th percentile, were associated with more frequent PTB < 32 weeks of GA.
Conclusion: Elevated umbilical cord serum concentration of CRP is associated with reduced risk for CLD even after adjusting for GA at delivery. Occurrence of levels > 75th percentile of IL-6, CRP, and MPO in umbilical cord serum was associated with PTB < 32 weeks of GA. Elevated umbilical cord serum concentrations of IL-6, CRP, and MPO at birth were not associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1359723

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2014

Journal Title

American Journal of Perinatology

Author(s)

Sorokin, Yoram
Romero, Roberto
Mele, Lisa
Iams, Jay D.
Peaceman, Alan M.
Leveno, Kenneth J.
Harper, Margaret A.
Caritis, Steve N.
Mercer, Brian M.
Thorp, John M., Jr.
O'Sullivan, Mary Jo
Ramin, Susan M.
Carpenter, Marshall W.
Rouse, Dwight J.
Sibai, Baha M.

PMCID

PMC4359689