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Sleep Duration and Obesity among Adolescents Transitioning to Adulthood: Do Results Differ by Sex?

Citation

Suglia, Shakira F.; Kara, Seema; & Robinson, Whitney R. (2014). Sleep Duration and Obesity among Adolescents Transitioning to Adulthood: Do Results Differ by Sex?. Journal of Pediatrics, 165(4), 750-754. PMCID: PMC4177276

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between short sleep duration and obesity among adolescents (mean age 16 years) transitioning into young adulthood (mean age 21 years) in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 10 076).
STUDY DESIGN: Self-reported sleep duration was categorized as <6, 6-8, or >8 hours. Obesity status, using measured height and weight, was defined as body mass index ≥95th percentile in adolescence and body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 in young adulthood.
RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, short sleep duration was associated with obesity in adolescent males (prevalence ratio 1.8 [95% CI, 1.3-2.4]) but not in females (prevalence ratio 1.0 [95% CI, 0.7-1.4]). In longitudinal analyses, short sleep duration in adolescence was associated with incident obesity in both males and females (risk ratio 1.2 [95% CI, 1.0-1.6]) in young adulthood. No interactions by sex were noted.
CONCLUSIONS: Analyzing the association of sleep duration and obesity longitudinally resolved sex discrepancies observed in earlier cross-sectional analyses. Optimizing sleep duration during adolescence may be an effective intervention to prevent excess weight gain in young adults.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.06.052

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2014

Journal Title

Journal of Pediatrics

Author(s)

Suglia, Shakira F.
Kara, Seema
Robinson, Whitney R.

PMCID

PMC4177276