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Development and Validity of a 3-Day Smartphone-Assisted 24-Hour Recall to Assess Beverage Consumption in a Chinese Population: A Randomized Cross-over Study

Citation

Smith, Lindsey P.; Hua, Jenna; Seto, Edmund Y. W.; Du, Shufa; Zang, Jiajie; Zou, Shurong; Popkin, Barry M.; & Mendez, Michelle A. (2014). Development and Validity of a 3-Day Smartphone-Assisted 24-Hour Recall to Assess Beverage Consumption in a Chinese Population: A Randomized Cross-over Study. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 23(4), 678-690. PMCID: PMC4270062

Abstract

This paper addresses the need for diet assessment methods that capture the rapidly changing beverage consumption patterns in China. The objective of this study was to develop a 3-day smartphone-assisted 24-hour recall to improve the quantification of beverage intake amongst young Chinese adults (n=110) and validate, in a small subset (n=34), the extent to which the written record and smartphone-assisted recalls adequately estimated total fluid intake, using 24-hour urine samples. The smartphone-assisted method showed improved validity compared with the written-assisted method, when comparing reported total fluid intake to total urine volume. However, participants reported consuming fewer beverages on the smartphone-assisted method compared with the written-assisted method, primarily due to decreased consumption of traditional zero-energy beverages (i.e. water, tea) in the smartphone-assisted method. It is unclear why participants reported fewer beverages in the smartphone-assisted method than the written-assisted method. One possibility is that participants found the smartphone method too cumbersome, and responded by decreasing beverage intake. These results suggest that smartphone-assisted 24-hour recalls perform comparably but do not appear to substantially improve beverage quantification compared with the current written record based approach. In addition, we piloted a beverage screener to identify consumers of episodically consumed SSBs. As expected, a substantially higher proportion of consumers reported consuming SSBs on the beverage screener compared with either recall type, suggesting that a beverage screener may be useful in characterizing consumption of episodically consumed beverages in China’s dynamic food and beverage landscape.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.6133/apjcn.2014.23.4.10

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2014

Journal Title

Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Author(s)

Smith, Lindsey P.
Hua, Jenna
Seto, Edmund Y. W.
Du, Shufa
Zang, Jiajie
Zou, Shurong
Popkin, Barry M.
Mendez, Michelle A.

PMCID

PMC4270062