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Integrating the Life Course and Life-Span: Formulating Research Questions with Dual Points of Entry

Citation

Shanahan, Michael J. & Porfeli, Erik J. (2002). Integrating the Life Course and Life-Span: Formulating Research Questions with Dual Points of Entry. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 61(3), 398-406.

Abstract

Although life-span psychology and life course sociology share much in common, they also differ in significant ways. One such difference concerns their points of entry into the study of human behavior: When formulating questions, life-span psychologists typically begin with cognitive, emotional, or motivational characteristics of the person, and life course sociologists often begin with social context and roles. Yet by developing research programs with dual points of entry, encompassing both psychological functions and social context and roles, behavioral scientists will encourage interdisciplinary work that cuts across the life-span and life course. This strategy also encourages research that examines person–context interactions, which are likely features of development and aging. We illustrate the dual points of entry approach by considering career development during the transition to adulthood.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/jvbe.2002.1882

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Journal of Vocational Behavior

Author(s)

Shanahan, Michael J.
Porfeli, Erik J.

Year Published

2002

Volume Number

61

Issue Number

3

Pages

398-406

Reference ID

8430