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Trends in Educational Attainment by Race/Ethnicity, Nativity, and Sex in the United States, 1989–2005

Citation

Everett, Bethany G.; Rogers, Richard G.; Hummer, Robert A.; & Krueger, Patrick M. (2011). Trends in Educational Attainment by Race/Ethnicity, Nativity, and Sex in the United States, 1989–2005. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 34(9), 1543-1566. PMCID: PMC3361133

Abstract

Despite the importance of education for shaping individuals' life chances, little research has examined trends and differences in educational attainment for detailed demographic subpopulations in the United States. We use labour market segmentation and cohort replacement theories, linear regression methods, and data from the National Health Interview Survey to understand educational attainment by race/ethnicity, nativity, birth cohort, and sex between 1989 and 2005 in the United States. There have been significant changes in educational attainment over time. In support of the cohort replacement theory, we find that across cohorts, females have enjoyed greater gains in education than men, and for some race/ethnic groups, recent cohorts of women average more years of education than comparable men. And in support of labour market segmentation theories, foreign-born Mexican Americans continue to possess relatively low levels of educational attainment. Our results can aid policymakers in identifying vulnerable populations, and form the base from which to better understand changing disparities in education. Despite the importance of education for shaping individuals? life chances, little research has examined trends and differences in educational attainment for detailed demographic subpopulations in the United States. We use labour market segmentation and cohort replacement theories, linear regression methods, and data from the National Health Interview Survey to understand educational attainment by race/ethnicity, nativity, birth cohort, and sex between 1989 and 2005 in the United States. There have been significant changes in educational attainment over time. In support of the cohort replacement theory, we find that across cohorts, females have enjoyed greater gains in education than men, and for some race/ethnic groups, recent cohorts of women average more years of education than comparable men. And in support of labour market segmentation theories, foreign-born Mexican Americans continue to possess relatively low levels of educational attainment. Our results can aid policymakers in identifying vulnerable populations, and form the base from which to better understand changing disparities in education.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2010.543139

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2011

Journal Title

Ethnic and Racial Studies

Author(s)

Everett, Bethany G.
Rogers, Richard G.
Hummer, Robert A.
Krueger, Patrick M.

PMCID

PMC3361133