Menu Close

The Application of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems in the Study of Geomorphology: An Introduction

Citation

Butler, David R. & Walsh, Stephen J. (1998). The Application of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems in the Study of Geomorphology: An Introduction. Geomorphology, 21(3-4), 179-81.

Abstract

Geomorphology has long been identified with field studies, whether they be the early observational sketches of William Morris Davis in New England, the comments of Albrecht Penck in the European Alps, or the insights of Powell, Gilbert, and Dutton in the American Southwest. In each case, the focus was on landscape characterization leading to process understanding. After more than one hundred years as a recognized discipline, landscape characterization through field studies remains at the heart of many geomorphological studies. New traditions have emerged that integrate the importance of fieldwork with modem technologies and paradigmatic shifts that combine to further strengthen the established link between landfolxns and the processes creating them. Laboratory experiments and simulation modeling, for example, have become accepted as complementary tools, working hand-in-hand with fieldwork in geomorphology. In this same tradition the emergence of applying remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques to the study of geomorphology has occurred. This special issue of Geomorphology is dedicated to the philosophy that remote sensing and GIS are tools that enhance and broaden the opportunities of geomorphology and together with field studies offer a robust synergistic design to explore a host of research questions associated with landscape characterization and the linkage of scale, pattern, and process.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1016/S0169-555X(97)00056-1

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Geomorphology

Author(s)

Butler, David R.
Walsh, Stephen J.

Year Published

1998

Volume Number

21

Issue Number

3-4

Pages

179-81

Reference ID

931