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The Academic Adaptation of Children of Immigrants in New and Established Settlement States: The Role of Family, Schools, and Neighborhoods

Citation

Potochnick, Stephanie R. (2014). The Academic Adaptation of Children of Immigrants in New and Established Settlement States: The Role of Family, Schools, and Neighborhoods. Population Research and Policy Review, 33(3), 335-364. PMCID: PMC4760698

Abstract

The dispersion of immigrants has challenged educators in new immigrant destinations to adapt to the needs of their first cohorts of children of immigrants. This paper evaluates how families, schools, and neighborhoods shape the academic adaptation of immigrants’ children in new and established immigrant states. Using the Educational Longitudinal Study from 2002, the paper examines how 10th grade math and reading test scores differ across three settlement locations: established, new, and other immigrant states. Results indicate that achievement in math and reading is the highest in new immigrant states. While demographic differences between settlement locations largely explained differences in achievement, families and schools in new immigrant states also strongly influenced achievement.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11113-013-9319-0

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2014

Journal Title

Population Research and Policy Review

Author(s)

Potochnick, Stephanie R.

PMCID

PMC4760698