Menu Close

Comparison of a Trial of Labor with an Elective Second Cesarean Section

Citation

McMahon, Michael J.; Luther, Edwin R.; Bowes, Watson A., Jr.; & Olshan, Andrew F. (1996). Comparison of a Trial of Labor with an Elective Second Cesarean Section. New England Journal of Medicine, 335, 689-695.

Abstract

Background: In an attempt to reduce the rate of cesarean section, obstetricians now offer a trial of labor to pregnant women who have had a previous cesarean section. Although a trial of labor is usually successful and is relatively safe, few studies have directly addressed the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality associated with this method of delivery.
Methods: We performed a population-based, longitudinal study of 6138 women in Nova Scotia who had previously undergone cesarean section and had delivered a singleton live infant in the period from 1986 through 1992.
Results: A total of 3249 women elected a trial of labor, and 2889 women chose to undergo a second cesarean section. There were no maternal deaths. The overall rate of maternal morbidity was 8.1 percent; 1.3 percent had major complications (a need for hysterectomy, uterine rupture, or operative injury) and 6.9 percent had minor complications (puerperal fever, a need for blood transfusion, or abdominal-wound infection). Although the overall rate of maternal complications did not differ significantly between women who chose a trial of labor and the women who elected cesarean section (odds ratio for the trial-of-labor group, 0.9; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.1), major complications were nearly twice as likely among women undergoing a trial of labor (odds ratio, 1.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 3.0). Apgar scores, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, and perinatal mortality were similar among the infants whose mothers had a trial of labor and those whose mothers underwent elective cesarean section.
Conclusion: Among pregnant women who have had a cesarean section, major maternal complications are almost twice as likely among those whose deliveries are managed with a trial of labor as among those who undergo an elective second cesarean section.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199609053351001

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

1996

Journal Title

New England Journal of Medicine

Author(s)

McMahon, Michael J.
Luther, Edwin R.
Bowes, Watson A., Jr.
Olshan, Andrew F.