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Predictors of Poor Maternal Weight Gain from Baseline Anthropometric, Psychosocial, and Demographic Information in a Hispanic Population

Citation

Siega-Riz, Anna Maria & Hobel, Calvin J. (1997). Predictors of Poor Maternal Weight Gain from Baseline Anthropometric, Psychosocial, and Demographic Information in a Hispanic Population. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 97(11), 1264-1268.

Abstract

Objective: To identify which baseline factors best predict poor maternal weight gain among Hispanics.
Sample: Pregnancy and outcome data collected prospectively from 4,791 Hispanic women attending public prenatal clinics in West Los Angeles, Calif, from 1983 through 1986.
Methods: Prepregnancy weight was categorized into weight status groups using body mass index (BMI). Poor total weight gain (based on a mean gestational age at last measurement, which was at 35 weeks) was defined as less than 21 lb for women with BMI less than 26 and less than 10 lb for women with BMI of 26 or greater. Analyses used Student's t test, chi 2, and multivariate regression techniques (linear and logistic).
Results: Poor total weight gain was identified in 29% of the women. For women who were underweight or normal weight before pregnancy, the only factor associated with increasing the risk of poor total weight gain was short stature (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.24, 1.84). The following factors decreased the risk: being US born (AOR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.37, 1.00); being primiparous and under 29 years old (for < 20 years AOR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.51, 0.92 and for 20 to 29 years AOR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.49, 0.81); planning the pregnancy (AOR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.67, 1.00); and having a close relative die during the pregnancy (AOR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.44, 0.95). For obese and overweight women, physical abuse by the baby's father increased the risk (AOR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.27, 8.01) of poor total weight gain, whereas receiving financial support from the baby's father decreased the risk (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37, 0.95).
Applications/conclusions: These baseline factors could aid in targeting nutrition and other social services earlier to pregnant Hispanic women. By strategically targeting pregnant women in greatest need of services, improvements in birth outcomes may be enhanced.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0002-8223(97)00303-9

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

1997

Journal Title

Journal of the American Dietetic Association

Author(s)

Siega-Riz, Anna Maria
Hobel, Calvin J.