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Substance Use Service Availability in HIV Treatment Programs: Data from the Global IeDEA Consortium, 2014-2015 and 2017

Citation

Parcesepe, Angela M.; Lancaster, Kathryn E.; Edelman, E. Jennifer; DeBoni, Raquel; Ross, Jeremy; Atwoli, Lukoye; Tlali, Mpho; Althoff, Keri N.; Tine, Judicaël; & Duda, Stephany N., et al. (2020). Substance Use Service Availability in HIV Treatment Programs: Data from the Global IeDEA Consortium, 2014-2015 and 2017. PLOS ONE, 15(8), e0237772. PMCID: PMC7451518

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Substance use is common among people living with HIV and has been associated with suboptimal HIV treatment outcomes. Integrating substance use services into HIV care is a promising strategy to improve patient outcomes.
METHODS: We report on substance use education, screening, and referral practices from two surveys of HIV care and treatment sites participating in the International epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) consortium. HIV care and treatment sites participating in IeDEA are primarily public-sector health facilities and include both academic and community-based hospitals and health facilities. A total of 286 sites in 45 countries participated in the 2014-2015 survey and 237 sites in 44 countries participated in the 2017 survey. We compared changes over time for 147 sites that participated in both surveys.
RESULTS: In 2014-2015, most sites (75%) reported providing substance use-related education on-site (i.e., at the HIV clinic or the same health facility). Approximately half reported on-site screening for substance use (52%) or referrals for substance use treatment (51%). In 2017, the proportion of sites providing on-site substance use-related education, screening, or referrals increased by 9%, 16%, and 8%, respectively. In 2017, on-site substance use screening and referral were most commonly reported at sites serving only adults (compared to only children/adolescents or adults and children/adolescents; screening: 86%, 37%, and 59%, respectively; referral: 76%, 47%, and 46%, respectively) and at sites in high-income countries (compared to upper middle income, lower middle income or low-income countries; screening: 89%, 76%, 68%, and 45%, respectively; referral: 82%, 71%, 57%, and 34%, respectively).
CONCLUSION: Although there have been increases in the proportion of sites reporting substance use education, screening, and referral services across IeDEA sites, gaps persist in the integration of substance use services into HIV care, particularly in relation to screening and referral practices, with reduced availability for children/adolescents and those receiving care within resource-constrained settings.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0237772

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2020

Journal Title

PLOS ONE

Author(s)

Parcesepe, Angela M.
Lancaster, Kathryn E.
Edelman, E. Jennifer
DeBoni, Raquel
Ross, Jeremy
Atwoli, Lukoye
Tlali, Mpho
Althoff, Keri N.
Tine, Judicaël
Duda, Stephany N.
Wester, C. William
Nash, Denis, for the IeDEA Consortium

PMCID

PMC7451518

Data Set/Study

International epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) consortium

Continent/Country

Central Africa
East Africa
Southern Africa
West Africa
Asia-Pacific
Carribean
Central America
South America
North America
Australia
Cambodia
China
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Malaysia
New Zealand
Philippines
Singapore
South Korea
Taiwan
Thailand
Vietnam
Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Haiti
Honduras
Mexico
Peru
Burundi
Cameroon
Democratic Republic of Congo
Republic of Congo
Rwanda
Kenya
Tanzania
Uganda
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
South Africa
Zambia
Zimbabwe
Benin
Burkina Faso
Cote d'lvoire
Ghana
Mali
Senegal
Togo
United States of America
Canada

State

All