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Perceptions, Experiences, and Preferences for Partner Services among Black and Latino Men Who have Sex with Men and Transwomen in North Carolina

Citation

Gonzalez Rodriguez, Humberto; Barrington, Clare; McCallister, Katherine Nicole; Guy, Jalila; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Hurt, Christopher B.; McNeil, Candice Joy; & Sena, Arlene C. (Online ahead of print). Perceptions, Experiences, and Preferences for Partner Services among Black and Latino Men Who have Sex with Men and Transwomen in North Carolina. Ethnicity & Health.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In the United States, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) disproportionately affect men who have sex with men (MSM) and transwomen of color. Partner services can prevent STI transmission by facilitating testing and treatment for partners of individuals diagnosed with an STI. Understanding client perspectives towards partner services is critical to their acceptance and uptake. This study examined perceptions, experiences, and preferences for partner services among Black and Latino MSM and transwomen in North Carolina.
DESIGN: We conducted seven audio-recorded focus groups in English (n = 5) and Spanish (n = 2). The audio was transcribed verbatim and we inductively analyzed data using field notes, systematic coding, and thematic comparison.
RESULTS: Black MSM reported the most exposure and experiences with partner services, and most perceived partner services negatively. Feeling supported and having flexibility characterized positive experiences with partner services among Black MSM; feeling judged or harassed characterized negative experiences. Black transwomen had less exposure to partner services and had a mix of positive reactions to the approach, along with concerns about client confidentiality. Most Latino participants were unaware of partner services and expressed openness to their potential. All participants preferred self-notifying and wanted flexible, discreet, supportive partner services with linkages to other wellness resources
CONCLUSION: Building off positive partner services experiences and responding to client preferences can enhance trust, acceptability, and service use.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13557858.2021.1899137

Reference Type

Journal Article

Article Type

Regular

Year Published

Online ahead of print

Journal Title

Ethnicity & Health

Author(s)

Gonzalez Rodriguez, Humberto
Barrington, Clare
McCallister, Katherine Nicole
Guy, Jalila
Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.
Hurt, Christopher B.
McNeil, Candice Joy
Sena, Arlene C.

Continent/Country

United States of America

State

North Carolina

Race/Ethnicity

Black
Hispanic/Latinx