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Overweight Adolescent African-American Mothers Gain Weight in spite of Intentions to Lose Weight

Citation

Black, Maureen M.; Papas, Mia A.; Bentley, Margaret E.; Cureton, Pamela; Saunders, Alicia; Le, Katherine; Anliker, Jean; & Robinson, Noni (2006). Overweight Adolescent African-American Mothers Gain Weight in spite of Intentions to Lose Weight. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 106(1), 80-87.

Abstract

Objective: This study sought to determine how dietary patterns, self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and intention to lose weight were associated with body size among adolescent African-American mothers 1 year after delivery and with changes in body size over the next year.
Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal self-reported measures were collected 1 year after delivery. Weight and height were collected 1 and 2 years after delivery.
Subjects: The subjects were 118 low-income, African-American adolescent mothers recruited after the birth of their first child.
Statistical Analyses: Multivariate analysis of covariance and multivariate regression analysis were conducted to examine predictors of body size 1 year after delivery and changes in body size over the next year. Analyses were adjusted for maternal age, education, breastfeeding history, and intervention.
Results: One year after delivery, 33.0% of mothers were overweight (body mass index [BMI] ?95th percentile) and 23.7% were at risk for overweight (BMI ?85th and <95th percentile). Mothers consumed a daily average of 2,527 kcal and 4.1 high-fat snacks. A total of 11% of normal-weight mothers, 22% of mothers at risk for overweight, and 44% of overweight mothers reported intention to lose weight, ?2=10.8, P<.01. Average maternal BMI z score increased 0.13 (3.9 kg) between 1 and 2 years after delivery, P<.01. Dietary patterns, self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and intention to lose weight were not related to body size or increase in body size.
Conclusions: One year after delivery, overweight among adolescent mothers was common and increased over time. Although nearly half of overweight mothers reported an intention to lose weight, their weight gain did not differ from that of other mothers, suggesting that they lack effective weight-loss behaviors, and may be good candidates for intervention. African-American adolescent mothers have high rates of overweight and snack consumption and may benefit from strategies to identify nutritious, palatable, affordable, and accessible alternatives to high-fat snack food.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2005.09.049

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2006

Journal Title

Journal of the American Dietetic Association

Author(s)

Black, Maureen M.
Papas, Mia A.
Bentley, Margaret E.
Cureton, Pamela
Saunders, Alicia
Le, Katherine
Anliker, Jean
Robinson, Noni